Roero: a unique biodiversity

Where there was once the sea

Where there was once the sea

Between five and two million years ago, during the Pliocene, the Roero district was covered by the sea. Its soils were formed by the sedimentation of detritus on the seabed and you can still find shells and fossils of whales and sea animals in our vineyards today. This ancient sea left us an immense geological wealth, influencing the types of soil, calcareous marl, which differentiates according to the geological era. All the soils are well suited to the cultivation of vines.

The value of biodiversity

The value of biodiversity

Vineyards, but also woods, fields, hazelnut trees and meadows: all this is the Roero. We live in a territory where the value of biodiversity is uniquely rich. Our woods are home to very special trees and flowers, including rare species of wild orchids. They are home to lots of different wild animals: roe deer, foxes, squirrels, badgers, hedgehogs, owls and numerous other species of birds. The local woods are also known for their production of tuber magnatum pico, the Alba White Truffle, a highly-prized and very aromatic underground fungus which is internationally renowned.

UNESCO World Heritage

UNESCO World Heritage

The vineyard landscapes of the Langhe-Roero and Monferrato became part of the UNESCO World Heritage List in June 2014. An acknowledgement of the beauty of the hilly landscape scattered with vineyards, medieval towers, Romanesque churches and castles. And there’s more. UNESCO has acknowledged the value of “cultural landscape”, the result of the combined action of nature and the skilful work of men and women who, down through the centuries, have preserved the hills, cultivating vines and making wine. This is why we like to talk about “world heritage”.

Territory